University of Massachusetts Led Study Indicates Microthrombosis Possible Trigger for Second Stage of COVID-19

University of Massachusetts Led Study Indicates Microthrombosis Possible Trigger for Second Stage of COVID-19

A multi-site study led by the University of Massachusetts addressed a topic that the global scientific community has been trying to determine: what is the initial driver of the second stage of Covid-19:  hyper-inflammation, immune dysregulation, or microthrombosis? This study might just have revealed the smoking gun that shows microthrombosis is caused by platelet apoptosis.

Recently, an active TrialSite community member sent an intriguing study for review. Led by corresponding author Milka Koupenova with the University Of Massachusetts, the study team wrote a concise and succinct conclusion. That is, “Platelets internalize SARS-CoV-2 virions or attach to microparticles, and viral internalization leads to rapid digression, programmed cell death and extracellular vesicle release.” Apparently, during the infection, “platelets mediate a rapid response to SARS-CoV-2 and this response can contribute to dysregulated immunity and thrombosis.”

Lead Research/Investigator

Milka Koupenova PhD, with University Of Massachusetts

Call to Action: If the study results turn out to be accurate, everyone would be well advised to keep a bottle of aspirin ...

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