UK’s Office for National Statistics Leads Study Revealing Nearly a Third of COVID-19 Hospitalized Patients Readmitted

UK’s Office for National Statistics Leads Study Revealing Nearly a Third of COVID-19 Hospitalized Patients Readmitted TrialsiteN

A yet to be peer-reviewed study sponsored by the Office for National Statistics, University College London and the University of Leicester has uncovered that of 47,780 studied people that were hospitalized and then discharged, nearly one-third of this population was again readmitted within 140 days due to a number of conditions, involving respiratory and cardiovascular in addition to diabetes. These readmission rates in England are particularly high involving ethnic minorities such as blacks and Asians. Of the total number of patients studied in this observational study, 29.4% had to be readmitted to the hospital and one in 10 (12.3%) of the total died.

The Study

The study focused on a patient population that was on average 65 years of age. The sponsors oversaw the effort between January and August. The team established two groups including the main study group and control group that involved those with similar demographics and of course, medical profiles. As it turns out, those who were diagnosed with COVID-19 had experienced a  3.5 times higher probability of readmission as well as death rate 7.7 times higher.

The English researchers uncovered that out of 14,140 people diagnosed post discharge and reentry, 6.095 of them didn’t have such symptoms previously. Those 50 and over are far higher at risk for severe complications, as well as face some comorbidity. This and other studies raise concern that many people that become infected with COIVD-19 face the specter of long-lasting damage either to the lungs, heart or even brain.

Lead Research/Investigators

A team of investigator led this effort including the following:

·         Daniel Ayoubkhani, Office of National Statistics, UK

·         Kamlesh Khunti, University of Leicester, UK

·         Daniel Ayoubkhani, Office of National Statistics, UK

·         Vahé Nafilyan, Office of National Statistics, UK                                

·         Thomas Maddox, Office of National Statistics, UK

·         Ben Humberstone, Office of National Statistics, UK

·         Sir Ian Diamond, Office of National Statistics, UK

·         Amitava Banerjee, University College London Hospitals, NHS Trust, UK

Call to Action: The study results were recently uploaded to the preprint server medXriv.