Sema4, Mt. Sinai and Sanofi Collaborate on Asthma Precision Medicine 5-Year Study

Sema4, a patient-centered predictive health company, and the Mount Sinai Health System today announced the launch of a five-year collaborative study with Sanofi designed to provide new insights into the biological mechanisms and other factors implicated in asthma. The project will follow nearly 1,200 people with asthma and collect a range of data—from traditional clinical data to genomics, immunological, environmental, and sensor data from mobile devices—to enable sophisticated analysis and advanced network modeling of this complex disease. Asthma is the most prevalent chronic respiratory disease, affecting more than 350 million people worldwide and causing approximately 400,000 deaths worldwide annually. Evidence shows that the prevalence of asthma is increasing, and along with it both direct healthcare costs as well as indirect costs from loss of productivity and early disability.

“Despite advances in recent years, we still see many patients struggling with asthma, so there is still a tremendous need for innovation to reduce the burden of this disease,” said Linda Rogers, MD, Associate Professor and Clinical Director of the Adult Asthma Program at the Mount Sinai-National Jewish Health Respiratory Institute. “With one of the largest asthma programs in the region, caring for patients across the spectrum of severity of asthma, the Mount Sinai-National Jewish Health Respiratory Institute will play a crucial role in this partnership to advance our understanding of asthma and develop personalized therapies for our patients.”

The study will generate real-world data about patients through innovative molecular profiling of biological samples and digital monitoring of the environment. Clinical research teams from all three organizations will deploy advanced analytics on this information to better understand how the disease functions, what triggers asthma attacks, which patient segments are most likely to respond to certain therapies, why the disease affects people differently and more. Researchers hope these insights will help pinpoint new therapeutic targets as well as more effective treatment recommendations for patients.

“Understanding how to develop new treatments for asthma starts with a better understanding of the disease,” said Frank Nestle, Global Head of Immunology and Inflammation Research and Chief Scientific Officer, North America, at Sanofi. “Our goal is to develop a holistic view of each patient in the study, which is why we’re excited to add digital technology to the traditional types of medical examinations conducted in this study. It’s a new way to approach this enormous problem, connecting real world clinical and scientific data, that we hope will translate into new ways to treat asthma.”

Lead Research/Investigator

Linda Rogers, MD, Mount Sinai

Frank Nestle, Global Head of Immunology and Inflammation Research, Chief Scientific Officer