Ohio State University Regenerative Therapy Targeting Ischemic Stroke Shows Positive Preclinical Results

Ohio State University Regenerative Therapy Targeting Ischemic Stroke Shows Positive Preclinical Results

Research scientists from Ohio State University are in hot pursuit of a regenerative therapy solution for ischemic stroke. By injecting a stem cell-based treatment, they investigate an alternative to the current treatment, which involves an anti-clotting agent that’s injected upon onset of symptoms. While still in preclinical research, thus far results in mice models look good. For example, these regenerative cells actually serve to trigger the growth of healthy, vascular tissue leading to regeneration of blood supply. With the findings published recently in peer-reviewed journal Science Advances, team leader Daniel Gallego-Perez believes the approach holds material promise based on early stage preclinical results.

The Results

Based on the recent published findings and a write up by Frank Vinluan for MedCity News, the preclinical results reveal that the stem cell therapy treatment led to an increase in blood flow in the subject mice, as compared to a control group measured at week two and then week three post the baseline injection. Amazingly, those mice that received the regenerative therapy actually regained 90% of their motor function, writes Mr. Vinluan. The MedCity News author also reports other positive signals, such as improved brain scans.

Funding

This research started back in 2016 with the access to funding thanks to grants from the National institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, both units of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Lead Research/Investigator

Daniel Gallego-Perez, PhD, Assistant Professor, General Surgery

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