NIH Study Reveals COVID-19 Far more Contagious than Previously Assumed

NIH Study Reveals COVID-19 Far more Contagious than Previously Assumed

A new COVID-19-based study led by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), CDC, UCLA and Princeton University find that the novel coronavirus can persist in the air and on surfaces for hours, if not days—highlighting just how contagious this virus may be. As it turns out, people can become infected in numerous ways as the novel coronavirus is detectable and stable on contaminated objects.

The Study

The team’s researchers attempted to mimic the virus and how it would be passed from one person to another—from various surfaces in the household, for example or hospital setting, reports WBAY2. This multi-center research team analyzed how long the COVID-19 virus could actually last on infected surfaces.

Disturbing Findings

It is looking like the COVID-19 is far more contagious then many had thought as it can persist in the air and on surfaces for hours. Well, it turns out that this virus can even be “detectable in aerosols for up to three hours, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel,” reported the National Institutes of Health. 

Carriers Abound

And more concerning, mounting evidence points to many more carriers of the contagion—innocent seemingly bystanders that don’t realize they are doing the malevolent virus’ deeds by not following explicit rules by government authorities guided by virologists and other medical and biological experts. Hence, it is highly likely that the virus is transmitted at an even greater velocity in the community setting rather than the healthcare setting. This seems counter intuitive but if the study investigators are correct—true.

Recommendations

As reported by Gray Media, be mindful; be wise; be careful. Don’t go close to people that are sick. Don’t touch your mouth, eyes or your throat. If you feel the least bit down and out—under the weather—say home and stay away from people to the extent you can in the home. Don’t ever not cover a sneeze or a cough and use a tissue and throw it out in the trash when you are done. Become maniacal about washing your hands and household objects—regularly clean and disinfect objects and surfaces touched often.

False Information: Ideologues or Idiots?

We have personally encountered individuals that don’t think that this is as bad as advertised by the governments and medical and health experts around the world. They will remind us that there are many more people that get the standard influenza and even die in any one flu season. From innocent misunderstanding to wacky political conspiracy theorists, unfortunately there are some that haven’t yet been able to accept what this contagion really means. We surely hope that all people come together and do what is needful and necessary. We would not like to have to see a situation where the State has to force such required safe behavior.

Lead Research/Investigators

Neeltje van Doremalen, Ph.D.
Trenton Bushmaker, B.Sc. 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT

Dylan H. Morris, M.Phil. 
Princeton University, Princeton, NJ

Myndi G. Holbrook, B.Sc. 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT

Amandine Gamble, Ph.D. 
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

Brandi N. Williamson, M.P.H.
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT

Azaibi Tamin, Ph.D. 
Jennifer L. Harcourt, Ph.D. 
Natalie J. Thornburg, Ph.D. 
Susan I. Gerber, M.D. 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

James O. Lloyd-Smith, Ph.D. 
University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, Bethesda, MD

Emmie de Wit, Ph.D. 
Vincent J. Munster, Ph.D. 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Hamilton, MT