National English Public Health Study Indicates Children Deaths from COVID Extremely Rare

National English Public Health Study Indicates Children Deaths from COVID Extremely Rare

A recent UK-based study authored by researchers from University College London as well as the University of York, University of Bristol, and the University of Liverpool represent perhaps the most complete such study yet on record concerning children and COVID-19. Analyzing public health data across England, the team of investigators found that COVID-19 isn’t as dangerous to children as many suspect and that mass media portrays on a near-nightly basis. In fact, the overwhelming majority of children that have died due to SARS-CoV-2 actually involved underlying health circumstances. Complicating any true risk analyses is challenged by the high relative prevalence of asymptomatic and non-specific disease manifestations. The authors conclude key analyses must factor in the differences among children and young people that have died due to SARS-CoV-2 versus those who passed away due to alternative conditions while coincidently testing positive for the novel coronavirus. Risk within the cohort isn’t evenly distributed as children over 10, from ethnic minorities (Asian or Black) and with comorbidities face a higher risk than the rest. TrialSite suspects other social determinants of health ...

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