Kaiser Permanente NorCal Research: Early Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV with ART Reduces Incidence of Cancer

Kaiser Permanente NorCal Research: Early Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV with ART Reduces Incidence of Cancer

New compelling research reveals that patients with HIV who are diagnosed early and placed on antiretroviral therapy (ART) show benefits, including reduced risk of certain types of cancers. The net takeaway: the earlier HIV can be diagnosed and ART introduced, the better for the patient, reports Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Division of Research.

The Study

Recently reported by Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Division of Research epidemiologist Michael Silverberg, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study, their results were published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

This study compared those with HIV who commenced ART within six months of entering care with another group starting ART later on. The early ART group had a 30% lower risk of all cancers, 64% less risk of AIDS-defining cancers (e.g., Kaposi sarcoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and 59% less risk of any virus-related cancer (including AIDS-defining cancers and others such as anal and liver cancers). These findings align with the results of a previous clinical trial that involved the investigation of ART and cancer risk.

This study, however, had a larger sample size, longer-term follow-up, and conclusions about a broader range of cancers with a known viral cause that was prevented with earlier ART initiation.

Large Scale, Longitudinal

The study pulled together data from nearly 15,000 people diagnosed with HIV between 1996 and 2014 at more than 200 clinical sites in the United States and Canada, including Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Division of Research epidemiologist Michael Silverberg, PhD, MPH, was the lead author of the study, published in August in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. Division of Research biostatistician Romain Neugebauer, PhD, contributed sophisticated statistical analysis to the study.

Follow up Q&A

In a Question and Answer follow up, Kaiser’s Michael Silverberg explained the study’s implications. Follow the link to review.

Lead Research/Investigator

Michael Silverberg, PhD, MPH, Lead Author

Romain Neugebauer, PhD