Why is Steve still promoting Hydroxychloroquine?

  • Why is Steve still promoting Hydroxychloroquine?

     shhaider updated 1 month ago 3 Members · 3 Posts
  • bhh1988

    Member
    June 19, 2021 at 9:56 pm

    I read https://trialsitenews.com/do-the-nih-and-who-covid-treatment-recommendations-need-to-be-fixed/

    I’m confused about the claims about HCQ made in this post. There are NEJM double-blind studies both for hospitalized (https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2022926) and prophylaxis (https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2016638) use-cases of Hydroxychloroquine, both coming out as negative. How do you reconcile that, especially the latter study, with the claims on this site that early-intervention has clear benefits?

    Also, see https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.09.18.20197327v1.full.pdf, which Steven funded and shows no benefit for HCQ.

  • mjnelson99

    Member
    July 12, 2021 at 5:00 pm

    Because it works and probably best with zinc taken, too.

    Today I would start with Ivermectin instead for COVID.

  • shhaider

    Member
    September 22, 2021 at 9:14 am

    Even Randomized Controlled Trials can be poorly designed and hobbled. See the letter to the editor for the hospitalized study on HCQ:

    We were surprised by the hydroxychloroquine dose chosen in the Randomized Evaluation of Covid-19 Therapy (RECOVERY) trial conducted by Horby et al. (Nov. 19 issue).<sup style=”font-family: inherit;”>1</sup> In this trial, patients received a higher dose of hydroxychloroquine (4 g cumulated over the first 3 days) than that administered in the trial conducted by Lagier et al.<sup style=”font-family: inherit;”>2</sup> (600 mg per day), and it was similar to that in the trial conducted by Borba et al.<sup style=”font-family: inherit;”>3</sup>

    In vitro studies show that the effect of hydroxychloroquine is mainly mediated by alkalinization of the phagolysosomes,<sup>4</sup> where it can concentrate about 1500 times more than in plasma. This effect can be obtained with low doses of hydroxychloroquine because of its long elimination half-life. High doses may therefore be useless or even deleterious because of the anti-interferon action of hydroxychloroquine,<sup>5</sup> which may result in a more severe form of Covid-19.<sup>6</sup> The dose used in the RECOVERY trial, the second highest after that in the trial conducted by Borba et al., arouses concern because it may have been a disease-aggravating factor negating the therapeutic effect.

Viewing 1 - 3 of 3 replies

Original Post
0 of 0 posts June 2018
Now